Which one of these groups BEST describes you? (Mark only ONE answer.)

문서에서 Key findings Short-term impacts of student listening circles on student perceptions of school climate and of their own competencies February 2017 (페이지 39-59)

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

White

Mixed (two or more) races

6. During the past 12 months, how would you describe the grades you mostly received in school?

Mostly A’s

Mostly A’s and B’s

Mostly B’s

Mostly B’s and C’s

Mostly C’s

Mostly C’s and D’s

Mostly D’s

Mostly F’s

How strongly do you disagree or agree with the following statements?

7. I feel like a real part of this school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

8. Sometimes I don’t feel as if I belong at this school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

No

Yes

No

Yes

Male

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

.

• •

• •

9. I am included in lots of activities at this school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

10. I feel very different from most students here.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

11. I wish I were in a different school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

12. I feel proud to belong to this school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

13. In our school, students are given a chance to help make decisions.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

14. Students in this school have a say in how things work.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

15. Students get to help decide some of the rules in this school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

16. Teachers ask students what they want to learn about.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

17. Students help decide how class time is spent.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

18. I enjoy participating at school because I want to have as much say in my school as possible.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

19. Students like me can really understand what’s going on with my school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

20. I feel like I have a pretty good understanding of the important issues which confront my school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

21. Students like me have the ability to participate effectively in school activities and decisionmaking.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

22. My opinion is important because it could someday make a difference in my school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

23. There are plenty of ways for students like me to have a say in what our school does.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

24. It is important to me that I actively participate in student issues.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

25. Most school leaders would listen to me.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

26. Many school activities are important to participate in.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

27. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who really cares about me.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

28. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who tells me when I do a good job.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

29. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who notices when I am not there.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

30. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who always wants me to do my best.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

31. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who listens to me when I have something to say.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

• •

• •

32. At my school, there is a teacher or some other adult who believes that I will be a success.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

Think about students your age (not just your closest friends) at your school. Mark how true each of the following statements is for you (if unsure, make your best guess).

33. Students my age really care about what happens to me.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

34. Students my age are there for me whenever I need help.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

35. Students my age can be trusted a lot.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

36. Students my age care about my feelings.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

37. Students my age only think about themselves.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

38. Students my age think bad things about me.

Not at all true

A little true

Pretty much true

Very much true

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

For the next questions, please rate how well you can do the following:

39. How well can you get teachers to help you when you get stuck on homework?

Not at all

Very well

40. How well can you study when there are other interesting things to do?

Not at all

Very well

41. How well can you study a chapter for a test?

Not at all

Very well

42. How well can you succeed in finishing all your homework every day?

Not at all

Very well

43. How well can you pay attention during every class?

Not at all

Very well

44. How well can you succeed in understanding all subjects in school?

Not at all

Very well

No

No

No

45. How well can you succeed in satisfying your parents with your homework?

Not at all

• •

• •

Very well

46. How well can you succeed in passing a test?

Not at all

• •

• •

Very well

For each adult at your school listed below, mark one answer for Part A and one answer for Part B.

Part A

I am certain that she/he knows my name 47. Ms. ___________________

Yes

I don’t know this person 48. Mr. ___________________

Yes

I don’t know this person 49. Ms. ___________________

Yes

I don’t know this person

<list of names continues until all staff are listed>

Part B

Please rate how comfortable you would be talking to her/him one–on–one about things that are bothering you?

50. Ms. ___________________

Not at all

• •

51. Mr. ___________________

Not at all

• •

52. Ms. ___________________

Not at all

• •

<list of names continues until all staff are listed>

Very

Very

Very

Staff survey

Student Listening Circle Study Consent Form for Adult Participation

Please complete this page and return it to the SLC Coordinator.

Adult participation involves:

Completion of surveys on three different occasions (15 minutes per survey).

Adult student listening circle invitee, please check the appropriate statement below and sign and return this page to the SLC Coordinator.

____ YES, I am willing to participate in the Student Listening Circle Study.

____ NO, I am not willing to participate in the Student Listening Circle Study.

Signature: _________________________________________________

Date: ________________

Name (Please Print): ________________________________________

Email Address (Used only to send follow–up surveys): _____________________________

Please return this page to the survey proctor.

Student Listening Circle Study Consent to participate

Student Listening Circle Adult Survey Dear SLC Adult Participant,

• This survey asks questions about things you think, feel, and do.

• There are no right or wrong answers.

• You do not have to answer these questions, but we hope you will. Skip any ques­

tion you don’t want to answer.

• Do not write your name on this paper. We want your answers to stay private!

• Please read every question carefully. Bubble in only one answer unless the ques­

tion asks you to mark all answers that apply.

Please bubble in your responses directly onto the survey using a #2 pencil.

Thank you for taking this survey!

1. What is your role(s) at this school? (Mark all that apply.)

Teacher—grade 6

Teacher—grade 7

Teacher—grade 8

Parent of student in school

Special education teacher

Administrator

Prevention staff nurse or health aide

Counselor, psychologist

Police, resource officer, or safety personnel

Paraprofessional, teacher assistant, or instructional aide

Other certificated staff (e.g., librarian)

Other classified staff (e.g., janitor, secretarial or clerical, food service)

Other service provider (e.g., speech, occupational, or physical therapist)

Community member not employed by school district

Other, please specify: ________________________________________________

How strongly do you disagree or agree with the following statements?

2. Students share their concerns with me.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

3. Students ask for comfort or support when needed.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

4. Students express their feelings to me.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

5. Students talk with me about their homes and families.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

6. Students talk openly to teachers and staff.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

• •

• •

7. Students are motivated to improve the school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

8. Students work well together.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

9. Students collaborate with each other.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

10. Students have a lot to contribute in school improvement decisions.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

11. Students respect the environment and are well-mannered toward others.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

12. Students participate actively in school activities.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

13. Students collaborate with teachers and staff to improve the school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

14. Students have unique perspectives about barriers to learning.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

15. Students offer constructive feedback about the school environment.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

16. This school encourages opportunities for students to decide things like class activities or rules.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

17. This school gives all students equal opportunity to participate in numerous extracur­

ricular and enrichment activities.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

18. This school gives students opportunities to “make a difference” by helping other people, the school, or the community.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

19. In this school, students are given a chance to help make decisions.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

20. Students are involved in helping to solve school problems.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

21. The principal asks students about their ideas.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

22. Students in this school are reliable.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

23. Students in this school can be counted on.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

24. The students in this school have to be closely supervised.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

25. Students are caring toward one another.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

26. Students here are secretive.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

27. Students in this school cheat if they have a chance.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

28. Students in this school can be counted on to do their work.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

29. The students in this school talk freely about their lives outside of school.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

30. I believe that I am helping kids become independent learners.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

31. I believe that I am empowering students.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

32. I feel that I am involved in an important program for children.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree 33. I see students learn.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

34. I believe that I have the opportunity to grow by working daily with students.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

35. I perceive that I am making a difference.

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

Thank you for taking this survey!

Notes

1. California was one of 11 states selected by the U.S. Department of Education to receive a Safe and Supportive Schools grant in October 2010. This four-year grant supported development of a statewide school climate measurement system and the implementa­

tion of targeted programmatic interventions to address school safety and bullying, sub­

stance abuse, positive relationships, other learning supports, and student engagement in school.

2. Students in the intervention group reported greater levels of comfort talking with SLC staff 12 weeks after SLC implementation than did students in the control group at the .02 significance level, but the difference was no longer statistically significant after an adjustment to compensate for the effects of conducting multiple statistical tests.

3. Although the results in table 4 represent regression-adjusted differences between the intervention and control group at a single point in time, the difference score represents the intervention/control group difference in change between pretest and follow-up because the impact model includes the pretest score as a covariate.

4. Students in the intervention group (but not in the control group) reported greater increases in perceptions of participation in decisionmaking at school and more comfort talking with staff participants in the student listening circles 12 weeks after the listening circle. These intervention/control group differences were not statistically significant after accounting for the increased probability of finding statistically signifi­

cant differences due to the number of statistical tests conducted.

5. Dichotomous variables representing each stratification category were included in the impact analysis models to account for the unequal random assignment probabilities for boys and girls.

6. In two schools, because of late arrivals of students on the day of the student listening circle, a replacement student was randomly selected to participate when eight inter­

vention group students were already available. This resulted in nine SLC participants

—eight intervention group students and one replacement student in these schools.

7. Because students in the replacement pool were randomly selected, they could have been transferred to the intervention group for data analyses without biasing compar­

isons between groups. Nevertheless, replacement students were kept in their original random assignment group as a conservative approach. The results were unchanged when replacement students were treated as intervention group students in the analysis.

8. To ease the survey burden, the grid system listed a maximum of 44 school staff. If this number was insufficient to accommodate all school staff, the survey listed all SLC adult participants who were school staff and randomly selected staff members until 44 slots on the questionnaire were filled.

9. The scale developed by Peterson et al. (2011) includes five level-of-agreement response options. For this study, the neutral option (neither agree nor disagree) was dropped, resulting in four response options.

10. The California School Climate, Health, and Learning Survey and Alaska School Climate and Connectedness Survey student involvement items have not previously been combined to form a summary measure. Therefore, evidence regarding reliabil­

ity of this new seven-item scale is not available. Factor analyses conducted to deter­

mine whether these seven items measure a single dimension of student opportunities for meaningful involvement indicated that these seven items do measure a single dimension.

References

Allison, P. (2002). Missing data. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Ames, C. (1992). Classrooms: Goals, structures, and student motivation. Journal of Educa­

tional Psychology, 84(3), 261–271.

American Institutes for Research. (2013). 2013 School Climate and Connectedness Survey:

Statewide report. Juneau, AK: Association of Alaska School Boards. Retrieved August 1, 2016, from http://alaskaice.org/school-climate/survey.

Benard, B. (2004). Resiliency: What we have learned. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

Benard, B., & Slade, S. (2009). Listening to students: Moving from resilience research to youth development in practice and school connectedness. In R. Gilman, E. S. Huebner,

& M. J. Furlong (Eds.), Handbook of positive psychology in schools (pp. 353–369). New York, NY: Routledge.

Benjamini, Y., & Hochberg, Y. (1995). Controlling the false discovery rate: A new and powerful approach to multiple testing. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B, 57(1), 1289–1300.

Black, A. E., & Deci, E. L. (2000). The effects of instructors’ autonomy support and stu­

dents’ autonomous motivation on learning organic chemistry: A self-determination theory perspective. Science Education, 84(6), 740–756.

Brand, S., Felner, R. D., Seitsinger, A., Burns, A., & Bolton, N. (2008). A large scale study of the assessment of the social environment of middle and secondary schools: The validity and utility of teachers’ ratings of school climate, cultural pluralism, and safety problems for understanding school effects and school improvement. Journal of School Psychology, 46(5), 507–535. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ807595

Brand, S., Felner, R., Shim, M., Seitsinger, A., & Dumas, T. (2003). Middle school improve­

ment and reform: Development of validation of a school-level assessment of climate, cultural pluralism, and school safety. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(3), 570–588.

Burgoa, C., & Izu, J. (2010). Guide to a student–family–school–community partnership: Using a student and data driven process to improve school environments and promote student success. San Francisco, CA: WestEd. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED566395

California Department of Education. (2015). California Department of Education Data Reporting Office. Sacramento, CA: Author. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://dq.cde.

ca.gov/dataquest/dataquest.asp.

Camino, L. (2000). Youth–adult partnerships: Entering new territory in community work and research. Applied Developmental Science, 4(1), 11–12.

Campbell, D. T., & Stanley, J. C. (1963). Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Caprara, G., Barbaranelli, C., Borgogni, L., & Steca, P. (2003). Efficacy beliefs as determi­

nants of teachers’ job satisfaction. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(4), 821–832.

Christens, B. D., Peterson, N. A., Reid, R. J., & Garcia-Reid, P. (2012). Adolescents’ per­

ceived control in the sociopolitical domain: A latent class analysis. Youth and Society, 4(1), 1–19.

Christens, B. D., & Kirshner, B. (2011). Taking stock of youth organizing: An interdis­

ciplinary perspective. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 134(1), 27–41. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ957303

Cook-Sather, A. (2002). Authorizing students’ perspectives: Toward trust, dialogue, and change in education. Educational Researcher, 31(4), 3–14.

Eccles, J., Wigfield, A., & Schiefele, U. (1998). Motivation to succeed. In W. Damon & N.

Eisenberg (Eds.), Handbook of child psychology, Vol. 3: Social, emotional and personality development (pp. 1017–1094). New York, NY: Wiley.

Education Alliance. (2004). A summary of research on using student voice in school improve­

ment planning. Charleston, WV: The Education Alliance. Retrieved September 1, 2016, from http://maaikerotteveel.pbworks.com/f/UsingStudentVoice+soort+literatuur studie.pdf.

Fielding, M. (2001). Students as radical agents of change. Journal of Educational Change, 2(2), 123–141.

Goodenow, C., & Grady, K. E. (1993). The relationship of school belonging and friends’

values to academic motivation among urban adolescent students. Journal of Experimen­

tal Education, 62(1), 60–71.

Hanson, T. L., Austin, G. A., & Lee-Bayha, J. (2004). Ensuring that No Child is Left Behind:

How are student health risks & resilience related to the academic progress of schools? San Francisco, CA: WestEd. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED486329

Hanson, T., & Voight, A. (2014). The appropriateness of a California student and staff school climate survey for measuring middle school climate (REL 2014–039). Washington, DC:

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory West. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED546900

Harris, J., Davidson, L., Hayes, B., Humphreys, K., LaMarca, P., Berliner, B., et al. (2014).

Speak out, listen up! Tools for using student perspectives and local data for school improve­

ment (REL 2014–035). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assis­

tance, Regional Educational Laboratory West. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED545367 Hoy, W. K., & Tschannen-Moran, M. (1999). Five faces of trust: An empirical confirma­

tion in urban elementary schools. Journal of School Leadership, 9(1), 184–208.

Huber, P. J. (1967). The behavior of maximum likelihood estimates under non-standard conditions. In L. M. Le Cam & J. Neyman (Eds.), Proceedings of the Fifth Berkeley Sym­

posium on Mathematical Statistics and Probability (pp. 221–233). Berkeley, CA: Universi­

ty of California Press.

Joselowsky, F. (2007). Youth engagement, high school reform, and improved learning out­

comes: Building systemic approaches for youth engagement. NASSP Bulletin: The Offi­

cial Journal of the National Association of Secondary School Principals, 91(3), 257–276.

http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ772783

Lee, L., & Zimmerman, M. (1999). Passion, action, and a new vision for student voice:

Learnings from the Manitoba School Improvement Program. Education Canada, 39(2), 34–35.

Mitra, D. L. (2003). Student voice in school reform: Reframing student–teacher relation­

ships. McGill Journal of Education, 38(2), 289–304.

Mitra, D. (2006). Increasing student voice and moving toward youth leadership. Prevention Researcher, 13(1), 7–10. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ793208

Mitra, D. (2008a). Balancing power in communities of practice: An examination of increasing student voice through school-based youth–adult partnerships. Journal of Educational Change, 9(3), 221–242. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ804169

Mitra, D. (2008b). Student voice in school reform: Building youth–adult partnerships that strengthen schools and empower youth. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Muris, P. (2001). A brief questionnaire for measuring self-efficacy in youths. Journal of Psy­

chology and Behavioral Assessment, 23(3), 145–149.

Muris, P. (2002). Relationships between self-efficacy and symptoms of anxiety disorders and depression in a normal adolescent sample. Personality and Individual Differences, 32(1), 337–348.

Newman, F. M. (1992). Student engagement and achievement in American secondary schools.

New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

O’Donoghue, J. L., Kirshner, B., & McLaughlin, M. (2002). Introduction: Moving youth participation forward. New Directions for Youth Development, 96(1), 15–26.

O’Malley, M. D., Voight, A., & Izu, J. (2013). Engaging students in school climate improve­

ment: A student voice strategy. In R. Gilman, E. S. Huebner, & M. Furlong (Eds.), Handbook of Positive Psychology in Schools, 2nd edition (pp. 329–346). New York, NY:

Routledge.

Peterson, N. A., Peterson, C. H., Agre, L., Christens, B. D., & Morton, C. M. (2011). Mea­

suring youth empowerment: Validation of a sociopolitical control scale for youth in an urban community context. Journal of Community Psychology, 39(5), 592–605. http://eric.

ed.gov/?id=EJ940717

Salmivalli, C., Ojanen, T., Haanpaa, J., & Peets, K. (2005). “I’m OK but you’re not” and

Salmivalli, C., Ojanen, T., Haanpaa, J., & Peets, K. (2005). “I’m OK but you’re not” and

문서에서 Key findings Short-term impacts of student listening circles on student perceptions of school climate and of their own competencies February 2017 (페이지 39-59)