Performance Goal 2.4.3: Securing Cyberspace

문서에서 FY 2015 Annual Performance Report FY 2017 Annual Performance Plan (페이지 87-90)

Performance Goal Statement: By September 30, 2017, implement the U.S. International Strategy for Cyberspace in 50 countries through diplomatic engagement and development assistance.

Performance Goal Overview

The 2011 U.S. International Strategy for Cyberspace envisioned an Internet which was “an open, interoperable, secure, and reliable information and communications infrastructure that supports international trade and commerce, strengthens international security, and fosters free expression and innovation.” To achieve this vision, “we will build and sustain an environment in which norms of responsible behavior guide states' actions, sustain partnerships, and support the rule of law in cyberspace.” In order to better secure cyberspace, the U.S.

government will work internationally, through both diplomatic engagement and development assistance, to promote international security in cyberspace through norms of behavior. It will also deter cybercrime by enhancing states’ ability to fight cybercrime, including training for law enforcement, forensic specialists, jurists, and legislators, and promoting international cooperation and information sharing. It will develop and augment relationships with other countries to improve collective cybersecurity and disrupt terrorist attack planning, coordination, illicit financing, and other crimes committed online.

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Strategic Goal 2: Strengthen America’s Foreign Policy Impact On our Strategic Challenges

Performance Goal Progress Update

Key Indicator: Number of countries in which International Strategy for Cyberspace is implemented

FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017

Target 18 22 28 38 50

Result 18 27 42

Indicator Analysis

As a result of additional diplomatic engagements and development cooperation initiatives, FY 2015 indicates a significant increase in the number of like-minded nations looking to partner with the United States to overcome global security challenges and support the principles outlined in the U.S. International Strategy for Cyberspace.

In FY 2015, the Department of State and Interagency partners further expanded policy dialogues and capacity building workshops with international regional organizations, such as the African Union Commission (AUC), the Organization of American States (OAS), and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), to highlight U.S.

interests and leadership in promoting an open, interoperable, secure and reliable Internet. These partnerships have equipped countries with a better understanding of a wide range of cyber issues and the policy implications that can help economies develop in a secure and efficient manner. Moreover, in FY 2015, the Department of State expanded its cybersecurity development assistance in Sub-Saharan Africa to include the coordination and development of Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) to better address and combat cyber threats.

The Department of State and USAID regional offices and posts have played a leading role in coordinating with existing allies, identifying and leveraging new relationships, commencing cyber policy conversations with target governments and constituencies, facilitating capacity building activities, reporting on progress, and following up after any bilateral or regional dialogues or trainings. A key milestone in these efforts was the April 2015 Global Conference on Cyberspace, hosted by the Government of the Netherlands, where the U.S. showed its leadership as a founding member of the Global Forum on Cyber Expertise, a voluntary global platform for countries,

international organizations and private companies to exchange best practices and expertise on cyber capacity building.

In FY 2015, the Department of State’s Office of the Coordinator on Cyber Issues (S/CCI) conducted trainings for State and USAID Foreign Service Officers on U.S. diplomatic and development engagement on cyber issues in the field. The first training took place in June 2014 for the Western Hemisphere (WHA) region, and subsequent trainings for the remaining regions were conducted in FY 2015 for the European (EUR), East Asia Pacific (EAP), South Central Asia (SCA), Near East (NEA) and African (AF) regions. In 2016, S/CCI plans to consolidate and centralize the regional trainings and conduct a Global Cyber Officer Workshop for both new and experienced

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Strategic Goal 2: Strengthen America’s Foreign Policy Impact On our Strategic Challenges

State and USAID Foreign Service Officers from Posts around the world. This workshop will ensure State and USAID personnel are currently and continuously prepared to engage in full spectrum cyber diplomacy.

With consistent and expanded efforts globally, it is expected that the number of like-minded countries will continue to grow, and the number of countries engaged in dialogues on cyber issues will increase.

Indicator Methodology

Data is based on diplomatic engagement and development assistance activities. Through primary source outreach and coordination, data is collected from U.S. Embassy and Post personnel, along with regional and functional bureaus, on countries where the U.S. has regular bilateral or multilateral engagements on cyber issues. Through interagency working groups, S/CCI works to ensure that diplomatic outreach on cyber issues is well coordinated and transparent, thereby helping to ensure that the data is high-quality, relevant and

representative.

Key Indicator: Percentage of countries with professionals that have successfully completed specialized cybersecurity training

FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017

Target 24% 48% 74% 100%

Result 44% 68%

Indicator Analysis

USAID provided development assistance through its Cyber Capacity Building Program (Cyber+). This program supports the U.S. International Strategy for Cyberspace through a combination of United States-based

cyberspace training, regional seminars and coordinated workshops. The Cyber+ program exceeded the target for the percentage of countries with professionals that have successfully completed specialized cybersecurity training last fiscal year by twenty percent. In FY 2015, the Agency supported 19 cybersecurity and cyber policy courses as originally planned. This enabled the program to continue to surpass the target by twenty percent.

Indicator Methodology

USAID works through its public-private partnership to provide the financial and technological resources needed to assist with securing cyberspace. USAID’s implementing partners collect data annually. The Agency tracks the number of countries with professionals who receive cybersecurity training and related technologies, as well as the successful completion of training. The performance indicator is calculated by dividing the number of countries with trained professionals by the overall target number. USAID acquires data from its primary implementing partner for the Securing Cyberspace performance goal. There are no known issues with data quality.

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Strategic Goal 2: Strengthen America’s Foreign Policy Impact On our Strategic Challenges

Strategic Objective 2.5: Strengthen America's Efforts to Combat Global Health

문서에서 FY 2015 Annual Performance Report FY 2017 Annual Performance Plan (페이지 87-90)

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